Is it bad to use the same word twice in a sentence?

On occasion, an immediate repetition of a word, separated by punctuation, is appropriate for emphatic effect, for example, I am far, far away from home. So, the rule is, repetition of a word in a sentence that makes grammatical sense isn’t wrong, but there is actually no reason for this to occur if you put the extra …

What is it called when you use the same word twice?

In literary criticism and rhetoric, a tautology is a statement which repeats an idea, using near-synonymous morphemes, words or phrases, effectively “saying the same thing twice”. Tautology and pleonasm are not consistently differentiated in literature.

Can you use to twice in a row?

2 Answers. It’s perfectly valid as is. It’s not particularly unusual to have a repeated word crop up in a sentence constructed like yours, in which a clause ending in a preposition is followed by a prepositional phrase: The wrestlers weighed in in the locker room.

Is it grammatically correct to use that that?

A: When a sentence has two words back to back, like “that that” or “this this,” we hear an echo. But there’s not necessarily anything wrong. But your sentences are good examples; both are grammatically correct and neither requires any special punctuation.

Can we use two that in a sentence?

Yes, the words “that that” can appear in a grammatically correct sentence. The first “that” is a relative pronoun (typically used to clarify something), and the second “that” is a demonstrative pronoun (specifying the subject matter at hand). For example: “Are you looking for these parts for your vacuum?

What is this and that in grammar?

from English Grammar Today. This, that, these and those are demonstratives. We use this, that, these and those to point to people and things. This and that are singular. These and those are plural.

Where is this and that used?

Generally speaking, we use this/these to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are close to the speaker or very close in time. We use that/those to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are more distant, either in time or physically. This is a great game.

When we use be and being?

WHAT is the difference between be, been and being? “BE” is the base form of the verb “be”; “been” is the past participle of the verb “be” and “being” is the present participle of the verb “be”.

Where do we use being?

Being is a word that can be hard to master for English as a Second Language speakers. It can be used as a gerund, or in present or past continuous tenses. In a present or past continuous tense, being says that it is happening now, or was happening before, in a continual manner. He is being nice.

Where we use be?

It is commonly found joining a subject to its complement.As a main verb, be is used to talk about: Feelings and states. For this we use the simple tenses of the verb with a suitable adjective. See Tense and Aspect.

Is being or are being?

I have been busy. NOT I have being busy. ‘being’ is the present participle of the verb ‘be’ and can be used with the continuous form of the verb ‘be’ is all its forms i.e. am, is, was, are and were. When I arrived at the scene of the accident the victim was being placed in an ambulance.

Is being being used?

“Is being” is used to describe an action that started in the past and continues at present. So these sentences have different meanings: “Something is changed” describes the state of something; it has changed, maybe recently, maybe a long time ago.

Are been is correct?

Originally Answered: Is it correct to use ‘was’ or ‘were been’ in the past tense? ‘Were been’ is incorrect English. It is ‘has been’ or ‘were’. In the past tense, why is “I” used with “was” (that is, used for he/she/it), while in the perfect present tense, “I” is used with “have” (that is, used for they/we)?

Is been done or is being done?

“Being” is the present participle of the verb “to be.” (For comparison, “cooking” is the present participle of the verb “to cook.”) “Been” is the past participle of the verb “to be.” (For comparison, “cooked” is the past participle of the verb “to cook.”)

Are being and have been?

Has been is present perfect tense; addition of the past participle makes it present perfect passive. Is being is present progressive tense; addition of the past participle makes it present progressive passive. Development of the product has started but is not yet finished.

Has been done or had been done?

1 Answer. “Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural. The past perfect tense refers to something that began in the past and was still true at another time that also was in the past.