What does it mean when you put apostrophes around a word?

Scare quotes (also called shudder quotes, sneer quotes, and quibble marks) are quotation marks that writers place around a word or phrase to signal that they are using it in a non-standard, ironic, or otherwise special sense.

Can you use apostrophes in essays?

Apostrophes can be used to create contractions (shortened forms of words or phrases). Overall, the apostrophe is not common in scientific writing. …

Where do we use apostrophes examples?

When using a singular noun, the apostrophe is used before the s. For example: “The squirrel’s nuts were stashed in a hollow tree.” When using a plural noun, the apostrophe goes after the s. For example: “The squirrels’ nuts were hidden in several hollow trees throughout the forest.”

What is apostrophe and its examples?

The definition of an apostrophe is the punctuation that is used to indicate possession, pluralization of abbreviations, and as an indicator of the exclusion of letters such as in a contraction. An example of usage of an apostrophe is to add ‘s to the name John when describing to whom his car belongs. noun.

What are the 2 types of apostrophes?

The two types of apostrophes are apostrophes of possession and contraction. Possessive apostrophes indicate ownership of something, like in the…

How do you use an apostrophe in a name?

Plural and Possessive Names: A Guide Add -es for names ending in “s” or “z” and add -s for everything else. When indicating the possessive, if there is more than one owner add an apostrophe to the plural; if there is one owner, add ‘s to the singular (The Smiths’ car vs. Smith’s car).

Where does the apostrophe go for ownership?

Use an apostrophe in the possessive form of a noun to indicate ownership. To show ownership, add apostrophe + s to the end of a word, with one exception: To show ownership with a plural noun already ending in s add only the apostrophe.

How do you write years with apostrophes?

When abbreviating a year, remove the first two numbers and indicate the omission by using an apostrophe:2009 becomes ’09 (not ’09)2010 becomes ’10 (not ’10)2525 becomes ’25 (if we’re still alive)

Is it Williams or Williams’s?

The name Williams is tougher because it ends with s. Names (and all other nouns, for that matter) that end in sibilants (that is, the sounds s, sh, ch, z, or x) are made plural by the addition of es. Thus the name Williams in its plural form is Williamses.

Is Williams’s correct?

The Associated Press Stylebook recommends just an apostrophe: It’s Tennessee Williams’ best play. But most other authorities endorse ‘s: Williams’s. Williams’s means “belonging to Williams.” It is not the plural form of Williams.

Is it Davis’s or Davis?

According to Grammarbook.com, the nerds of the world will argue heatedly on the subject for eternity, but the most roundly accepted rule is to include the apostrophe, along with an extra “S.” (Davis’s rather than Davis’).

How do you pluralize proper names?

There are really just two rules to remember, whether you’re pluralizing a given (first) name or a surname (last name): If the name ends in s, sh, ch, x or z, add es. In every other case, add s.