What does it mean if sed rate is high?

Published by Charlie Davidson on

What does it mean if sed rate is high?

A high sed rate is a sign you have a disease that causes inflammation in your body. Some conditions and medicines can affect the speed at which red blood cells fall, and they may affect your test results. These include: Anemia.

What does Westergren sed rate test for?

A Sedimentation Rate Blood Test, Westergren evaluates the nonspecific activity of infections, inflammatory states, autoimmune disorders, and plasma cell dyscrasias.

What is a good sed rate?

The normal range is 0 to 22 mm/hr for men and 0 to 29 mm/hr for women. The upper threshold for a normal sed rate value may vary somewhat from one medical practice to another. Your sed rate is one piece of information to help your doctor check your health.

What infections cause high sed rate?

High sedimentation rates may be caused by:

  • Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Cancer, such as lymphoma or multiple myeloma.
  • Chronic kidney disease.
  • Infection, such as pneumonia, pelvic inflammatory disease, or appendicitis.

What does a high sedimentation rate indicate?

High sedimentation rates indicate inflammation somewhere in the body. Extremely high sedimentation rates are associated with serious diseases, such as infection or cancer, including bone cancer.

What is a normal sedimentation rate?

The normal sedimentation rate (Westergren method) for males is 0-15 millimeters per hour, females is 0-20 millimeters per hour. The sedimentation rate may normally be slightly higher in the elderly.

How can I lower my sed rate?

Natural herb and spice supplementation work hand in hand with a healthy diet to lower sedimentation rates. Limit or eliminate red meat, alcohol, hydrogenated fats, refined sugars and flours. These foods encourage inflammatory responses.

What is considered a high sed rate?

A high sed rate is a sign you have a disease that causes inflammation in your body . Some conditions and medicines can affect the speed at which red blood cells fall, and they may affect your test results. These include: Anemia. Older age. Kidney problems. Thyroid disease. Pregnancy or having your period .

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