What is the Wallenberg syndrome?

Published by Charlie Davidson on

What is the Wallenberg syndrome?

Wallenberg’s syndrome is a neurological condition caused by a stroke in the vertebral or posterior inferior cerebellar artery of the brain stem.

What are the symptoms of Wallenberg syndrome?

Symptoms

  • pain and temperature sensory loss on one side of the face as well as on the opposite side of the body.
  • rapid involuntary movements of the eyes ( nystagmus )
  • problems with balance and gait (walking) coordination.
  • vomiting.
  • vertigo.
  • nystagmus.
  • dysphagia.
  • hoarseness.

Is Wallenberg syndrome permanent?

Complications of Wallenberg Syndrome Stroke syndromes can cause permanent disability and affect normal daily functioning, per StatPearls.

How do you test for medulla?

Usually, a neurologist can identify a medullary stroke during a physical examination, but if the symptoms are mild, then it might not be very apparent in the early stages. Diagnostic testing includes imaging studies such as a brain CT scan or a brain MRI.

What type of stroke is Wallenberg syndrome?

Related Conditions and Causes of Wallenberg Syndrome Wallenberg syndrome is often caused by an ischemic stroke. Ischemic strokes account for about 87 percent of all strokes, according to the American Stroke Association.

What is a pica stroke?

The Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (PICA) carries blood to this part of the brain. This stroke (Wallenberg’s Syndrome) causes the person to have balance problems and lean to one side. They may also have numbness on one side of the face and body and an eye droop. They may have hoarseness and trouble swallowing.

What are the symptoms of Wallenberg’s syndrome?

Wallenberg’s syndrome is a neurological condition caused by a stroke in the vertebral or posterior inferior cerebellar artery of the brain stem. Symptoms include difficulties with swallowing, hoarseness, dizziness, nausea and vomiting, rapid involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and problems with balance and gait coordination.

Why was Wallenberg syndrome named after Adolf Wallenberg?

Named after Adolf Wallenberg in 1895, this neurological condition is characterized by lateral medullary infarction resulting from an occlusion of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) or the vertebral artery.

How is Wallenberg syndrome related to PICA syndrome?

Wallenberg syndrome = Lateral medullary syndrome (aka ‘PICA’ syndrome Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery syndrome) Constellation of neurologic symptoms due to injury to the lateral part of the medulla in the brain Sensory deficits affecting the trunk (torso) and extremities on the opposite side of the infarction

Where is the infarcted area in Wallenberg syndrome?

The infarcted area in Wallenberg syndrome is supplied by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) usually secondary to atherothrombosis of the vertebral artery (80%), or posterior inferior cerebellar artery.

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