Which isotope is the parent isotope?

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Which isotope is the parent isotope?

An isotope that undergoes radioactive decay, its nuclei disintegrating spontaneously to form a daughter isotope (often of a different element). For example, rubidium-87 is the parent isotope of strontium-87, into which it decays with a half-life of 4.88 × 1010 years.

What is the relationship between parent and daughter isotopes?

Atoms of a parent radioactive isotope randomly decay into a daughter isotope. Over time the number of parent atoms decreases and the number of daughter atoms increases. Rutherford and Soddy (1902) discovered that the rate of decay of a radioactive isotope depends on the amount of the parent isotope remaining.

How do you find parent and daughter isotopes?

Radiometric Dating – Graphical Method For example, after one half-life 0.5 of the original parent isotope remains, 0.5 of the sample is now the daughter isotope. After two half-lives 0.25 of the original parent isotope remains, 0.75 of the sample is now the daughter isotope.

How much of the parent isotope is left?

After 5 half-lives (2500 years), 31.25 g of the parent isotope will remain. After 6 half-lives (3000 years), 15.625 g of the parent isotope will remain. After 7 half-lives (3500 years), 7.8125 g of the parent isotope will remain.

Is carbon 14 a parent isotope?

Decay of Unstable Isotopes Like other unstable isotopes, carbon-14 breaks down, or decays. The original atoms are called the parent isotopes. For carbon-14 decay, each carbon-14 atom loses an beta particle. It changes to a stable atom of nitrogen-14.

What is an example of an original parent isotope?

A parent isotope is one that undergoes decay to form a daughter isotope. One example of this is uranium (atomic number 92) decaying into thorium (atomic number 90). The daughter isotope may be stable or it may decay to form a daughter isotope of its own.

Is a parent isotope stable?

Isotopes are forms of an element that have the same number of electrons and protons but different numbers of neutrons. The original unstable isotope is called the parent isotope, and the more stable form is called the daughter isotope.

Are daughter isotopes unstable?

How much of a parent isotope is left after 2 half-lives?

After two half-lives, 75% of the original parent atoms have been transformed into daughter products (thus, only 25% of the original parent atoms remain). After three half-lives, only 12.5% of the original parent atoms remain. As more half-lives pass, the number of parent atoms remaining approaches zero.

What percentage of radioactive nuclei are left after 6 half-lives?

Half-life

Number of half-lives elapsed Fraction remaining Percentage remaining
5 1⁄32 .125
6 1⁄64 .5625
7 1⁄128 .78125

Is the daughter isotope always different from the parent isotope?

However, the parent isotopes are always unstable isotopes. Furthermore, it is also important to note that the daughter isotope is always a different chemical element than the parent isotope. The below infographic summarizes the difference between parent and daughter isotopes.

How are parent isotopes part of the decay chain?

Parent isotopes are the isotopes of a particular chemical element that can undergo radioactive decay to form a different isotope from a different chemical element. During this radioactive decay, these isotopes release decay particles such as alpha, beta and gamma rays. A parent isotope is the beginning of a decay chain.

Which is the parent isotope of strontium-87?

An isotope that undergoes radioactive decay, its nuclei disintegrating spontaneously to form a daughter isotope (often of a different element). For example, rubidium-87 is the parent isotope of strontium-87, into which it decays with a half-life of 4.88 × 10 10 years.

How does the number of radioactive parent isotopes decrease?

Over time, the numbers of radioactive parent isotopes will decrease as they decay into the daughter products. The abundance determination of radiogenic daughter isotopes is applied extensively for age determinations of geological and organic materials.

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