Where do you place a splash cymbal?

Published by Charlie Davidson on

Where do you place a splash cymbal?

I mount a splash cymbal off a cymbal stand that has a boom that can create space for both cymbals. If you want to mount a splash in the middle of the kit, it’s easiest with a rack system. But whatever you do, avoid mounting the splash to the tom arms, especially if the toms are mounted to the kick drum.

What do you use a splash cymbal for?

Splash cymbals are usually used much like crash cymbals, to provide accents, but are also used for special drumming effects. Generally small and thin, they have a sound that is sharp and short, like a water splash (geddit?). Sometimes these are referred to as multi-crash or crescent cymbals.

What is the difference between splash and crash cymbals?

Most splash cymbals are in the size range of 6″ to 13″, but some splash cymbals are as small as 4″. Some makers have produced cymbals described as splash up to 22″, but a splash of 14″ or more is more often described as a crash cymbal. Traditional splash cymbals, medium in weight with little or no taper.

What size splash cymbal should I get?

What splash size should I get? The bigger the splash, the longer the sustain of the cymbal. The smaller the splash, the shorter the sustain. So, a 12” splash cymbal is going to ring for a lot longer than an 8” splash cymbal.

Can you use a ride cymbal as a crash?

A ride/crash cymbal is similar in design and function to a crash/ride, but slightly heavier and/or less tapered to optimise the ride rather than the crash function. It is far less common than the crash/ride. In a very small kit, one may be the only suspended cymbal, used as both crash and ride.

What is the upside down cymbal called?

The name “China cymbal” comes from their shape, which is similar to the Chinese Bo. They are most frequently mounted upside down on cymbal stands, allowing for them to be more easily struck and for a better sound.

Can you use a crash cymbal as a ride?

A ride/crash cymbal is similar in design and function to a crash/ride, but slightly heavier and/or less tapered to optimise the ride rather than the crash function. Crash/ride and ride/crash cymbals have several uses: In a very small kit, one may be the only suspended cymbal, used as both crash and ride.

Are Sabian and Zildjian related?

Zildjian founded Sabian Cymbals in Meductic in 1981 after a legal battle with his brother over inheritance of the Zildjian family business. The two companies remain competitors and world leaders in the cymbal business.

Do clean cymbals sound better?

Before you actually start cleaning, you should consider how you like your cymbals to sound – because yes, cleaning a cymbal can have an effect on it. A cymbal that’s either brand new or has been cleaned is going to sound brighter than one that’s seen a lot of use (and hasn’t been cleaned regularly).

What are the dimensions of a splash cymbal?

Traditional splash cymbals, as first popularized by Gene Krupa, are 8″-12″ in size and medium in weight with little or no taper and therefore a thick rim for their size. The normal function of a splash cymbal is to provide a short, often highly syncopated accent. For their size, they are hit relatively hard to produce a quick attack and decay.

Where does a splash cymbal go on a bass drum?

The rim-mounted boom is restricted to splash cymbals owing to the weight of other cymbal types, but similar mounts, traditionally on the top of the rear rim of the bass drum but also on other drums, are occasionally used for other lightweight accent effects, particularly a cowbell and/or a wood block.

Which is the correct way to stack a splash cymbal?

However the older technique, using a china splash on top of a crash, china or another splash, also remains popular. Stacking should not be confused with piggybacking, in which the upper cymbal is bell down, the lower cymbal bell up, and a spacing felt is used between the cymbal bells, preventing any contact.

Can a cymbal be mounted on a double stand?

By use of a double stand that mounts the top cymbal on an extension of the stand that replaces the wing nut holding the bottom cymbal. These are commercially available but more often created by adding an accessory to a single stand.

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